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Species Spotlight: Brown Trout

Species Spotlight: Brown Trout

Name: Brown Trout

Scientific Name: Salmo Trutta

Description: The Brown Trout has a torpedo-shaped body with stocky shoulders. Their colours can differ from the normal brown/yellow with red and black spots to the complete chrome bodies of the fish. Brown Trout generally put up a good account of themselves when hooked but in some destinations, this can be amplified tenfold with these particular fish being revered for their power.

Average Size: The average size of the species in the UK tends to be smaller than that of Northern Europe, New Zealand and South America.

Where to catch: Argentina leads the way for its Sea Trout fishing with its rivers full of big migratory fish that anglers travel from all over the globe to target, these fish were stocked into Argentina’s rivers back in 1904 and have flourished ever since. Some of the country’s top rivers include the Rio Grande, Rio Gallegos and the intermate Irigoyen river. These rivers differ in size, surroundings and the way that they are fished but they all have one thing in common, monster Sea Trout. It is not just the countries Sea Trout that have done extremely well, the non-migratory Brown Trout fishing throughout the region of Patagonia is world-class, as well as being overlooked by many anglers who only have eyes for their silver cousins.

Although many anglers do look at these far-flung parts of the world when considering a Brown Trout fishing destination, it isn’t just the introduced populations that offer fishing of this class. Many parts of Europe offer great Brown Trout fishing, Iceland’s Lake Thingvallavatn is probably at the forefront of “native fishing” and could lay claim to the greatest of all the Brown Trout destinations. The trout of lake Thingvallavatn are unique in their appearance with chrome bodies that can put the freshest of Sea Trout to shame and a growth rate that exceeds that of any normal Brown Trout, reports of fish over the colossal 30lb bracket claimed most years.

The land of the long white cloud is regarded by many as the best Brown Trout sight fishing in the world, with its crystal rivers being home to some large and extremely Whiley fish. Unfortunately, New Zealand’s reputation has increased its angling pressure tenfold in the last few years, this has made getting onto good quality water much tougher and fishing even tougher still. For anglers wishing to experience New Zealand sight fishing at its best then the services of a good guide are almost a necessity as you will be able to access unpressured rivers and stand a much better chance of catching the fish of your dreams.

Fishing Methods: One of the things that seem to really interest people about Brown Trout is the many different fly fishing methods that they can be caught. Dry fly fishing will give great pleasure to the traditionalist. Anglers looking to maximise numbers of fish caught might use a team of wet flies and if you are a trophy angler looking for that one big fish then streamer patterns would normally seek out the larger more predatory fish.

In fact, it is probably fair to say that the humble Brown Trout epitomizes the very essence of fly fishing, and although the species can sometimes be overlooked, a big wild Brown Trout is a fish that all sports fisherman will have high up on the bucket list.

If you have any questions about our Brown Trout fishing trips contact our experienced team who will be able to help with any questions you have. Alternatively, you can request a free brochure.

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